Practicing the Sliding Tackle

Practicing the Sliding Tackle

Apr 30
Practicing the Sliding Tackle

While the move is not in and of itself a foul play, you’ll find many players who execute a sliding tackle in football will end up getting their team hit with a penalty kick or free kick, or with a much more personal yellow card or straight up sending-off with a red card. If you ask me though, the major problem with the sliding tackle is the fact most people don’t train for it. It’s not a move that gets used as often as passes and kicks in football, and so naturally players don’t spend as much time learning to master it. But what if they did?

Well, you’d see a lot more people forcibly taking the ball from each other in professional and amateur games, I’d bet. You’d also see a lot more people wearing guards on their legs if more players were sliding and kicking. The problem with more people utilizing a move is essentially that they don’t necessarily all know how to perform the move. Unlike a bad pass or shot which could get turned over or give the other team a chance to score, a bad sliding tackle can seriously injure both the target as well as the tackling player, perhaps even enough to end a career, like if a leg or ankle is broken in the process.

Practicing the sliding tackle is crucial for learning how to execute it without hurting yourself or the people you target with it during gameplay. As tempting as it might be, you don’t want to catch even the smallest piece of their foot, shin, thigh or any other part of their body. You want to get in low and fast, send the ball away from their feet and give your teammates an opportunity to get back the ball. The only problem with practicing the tackle is that you’ll have a hard time finding other players who want to risk getting a high speed kick to some part of the lower body, just to help you learn a move.

Fortunately, there are items like these grappling dummies which were more or less designed to take abuse from people. While you aren’t practicing any martial arts moves, these dummies accurately emulate the size and shape of a person, so if you were to set a ball between the feet of one and try to slide tackle it away that would be very similar to practicing the move on another live person. While the dummy won’t run around or try to avoid you, you will know if you kick it during your tackle, which will tell you if you’re aiming correctly or using too much force relative to where you begin sliding.

This AMBER LEGGED DUMMY would be as good a choice as any other. You need something which is visible and easy to see, but also durable enough that it can stand up to getting kicked, and regularly. Because you probably won’t be using your above the leg level for too much, you might have a unique opportunity to resell your used dummy later and recoup some of the costs. Or you should just flip it over and use the arms as if they were legs once the actual legs are too worn and damaged from use.